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at the present surplus on education reform. this event is about 45 minutes. [applause] first we think you very much for joining us. i know you've had a couple of busy days from last evening jon stewart to this morning appears morgan coming and we are delighted to have our wonderful friends here from c-span filming this event that many people across the united states can really benefit from a lot of what michelle has to say. to kickstart the seasoning how did you come up with a fascinating and interesting book and where does this interesting name come from? >> i think the genesis of the name is interesting in that when i first got to d.c., it was the lowest performing and most dysfunctional school district in the entire nation to be the was a pretty widely known truth. and so, i started doing things that i thought were obvious for school district in that kind of state and started closing the low performing schools, moving out and effective employees, cutting the central office board of bureaucracy in half and as i was taking all these steps and measures, people started saying she's a ra
strong. like education, the ability of students to attend college, medical research and inthe noah vation, the about of -- ability of our older neighbors to live their lives in dignity in their retirement years through medicare and long-term care. now we get a lot of advice and economists across the board, in fact, our own congressional budget office, advise that the best and fastest way to reduce the deficit to is to make sure people across america have jobs and are working. it is inexplicable that the republican budget proposes to eliminate jobs in construction, in education, scientific research, and instead heaps the burden on middle class families. experts predict the republican budget will reresult in job losses of two million fewer jobs next year alone. that's on top of 750,000 jobs lost by the end of the year due to the sequester republicans will not replace. just as the economy is improving for our neighbors and small businesses back home. in contrast, the democratic alternative will cren rate 1.2 million more job, stop the sequester and in committee, democrats proposed to close t
big changes in the public schools. our chief education correspondent rehema ellis is in detroit tonight after an all day conference as part of our education nation initiative. good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. detroit is like a lot of cities struggling with budget deficits and closing schools like the one behind me. proposed shut-downs in chicago are more and bigger than any city has ever attempted all at one time. outrage intensified as word spread. 54 public schools in chicago are slated to close at the end of this school year. >> my child has been here since he's been going to school. >> it's so sad to think that they are all going to be separated. >> reporter: the city is working to address a $1 billion deficit and says the closures could save $560 million over ten years. before it can save it has to spend. $223 million to reconfigure the schools absorbing new students. >> this policy is racist, classist and we have to continue to say that our mayor who is away on a ski trip drops this information right before spring break. this is cowardly. it's the ultimate b
's not without the controversy, but the budget cuts that are from educators to parents about the morality of corporate advertising in schools is certainly causing a stir. yet, filling the financial shortfall is the biggest prem fa prem-- problem facing schools today. and he needs funding. >> american public education is in financial crisis. >> he heads up education funding partners, a colorado firm that matches it with schools looking for cash. >> they want the right partners and the right controls, our model gives them that control. >> over the years more schools have been turning to corporate sponsors for much needed revenue. they struck a deal with staples in exchange for ads on the district's website and a supply list containing a coupon and kids got to attend the science enrichment program. >> it's really about selling anything, it's about allowing companies to come in and partner for a good cause and public education in responsible ways. >> there are aggressive campaigns out there buses and playing fields becoming common. for some districts it's what keep the doors open. critics arg
important. so i thought i'd mention that. the other thing that we are moving towards in education is more digital. we'll see less textbooks and more digital learning and with that we are promoting a digital literacy policy which deals with a number of issues and i'm going to go back and look at the draft policy to see how well it deals with the kind of issues rob and your family have dealt with in terms of using the internet safely and being aware of the harm you can do to yourself and to others by the way digital news can get around. >> assemblyman. >> thank you very much. i'm very, very heartened. this was an issue that's been in the closet for too long. i think high profile nationally now as well and we have super stars involved, lady gaga, myself, but you got to reach young people. usually peers are the best, i think, in terms of communicating things and then absolutely the parents. let's keep working, i'm only as good as the information i have and so we want to do the most effective long-lasting legislation. you know what happens sometimes, something is written in law but the a
voices to help educate people. we have so many screaming people on both sides of the equation, and we're not making enough progress. >> dr. carson, i watched you, and we've been on the show before, for which i am grateful, and i've watched you on other shows and have been reading about you. it looks like you are a problem solver and looking for common ground. i get that. that's probably something lacking in this country. i just had a thought on the economy. if you take a look at unemployment rates, overall, 7.7% is not the worst thing in the world, but four years after the recovery, it should be lower. here's the ones that are killers, and i just want to get your thoughts on how to solve it. teenage employment in the usa, total teenage employment, 25%. overall black employment, 13.8%. and the worst one is teenage black employment, 43%. how in the world can we solve those problems, sir? >> it's going to take a concerted effort. first of all, we as a society need to recognize for every one of those young people we can keep from going on the path of despair, that's one more tax paying pr
care reduction. no, no wants to do that. and no one wants to eat our seed corn. investment in education, investment in infrastructure, investment in sign b scientific research in order to keep narrow loopholes open, reductions if you move the business overseas. no, they don't want to debate that. but now we have a budget. because of the leadership of the chair of the budget committee and the members of her committee -- and, by the way, this is no -- this is not a small group of democrats. it runs from our most liberal members to our most conservative members, all united around the budget that is fiscally responsible. it meets the gramm-rudman -- i mean, i'm on old guy -- the simpson-bowles constraints, budget target. it invests in jobs in the economy, and closes loopholes and preserves the middle class' ability to grow and proceed. so, we now are, you know, in this 30-hour thing. we could actually be debating the budget while those 30 hours tick. we don't have to be sitting here doing nothing. and one of our colleagues said, he'd like to debate the budget two weeks from now. why is he p
to work this year with specific and targeted investments, while investing also in education, energy, research and infrastructure and keeping our commitment to america's seniors. our plan is fair, balanced, reasonable and responsible. it is pro-growth, pro-people, pro-america and approach favored by the majority in this country. i yield back the balance of my time. mr. horsford: thank you, congresswoman bass. and to focus on jobs and investing in our future, the fact that is pro-growth, pro-people and 70% of the american people support this type of approach is why the c.b.c. is offering this as an alternative to the house republican majority. and to speak further on the pro-growth needs of this budget, my representative -- my colleague, i should say in the new freshman class. it's been a delight to get to know her, the gentlelady from ohio, representative beatty. mrs. beatty: thank you so much. thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to discuss house budget committee chairman ryan's fiscal year 2014 budget and democratic alternatives that work. i first want to thank my colleague, mr. ho
an index fund. they have to educate for themselves. >> that's an interesting point. most people would think the opposite. putting my money in a bank is not risky. an index fund is risky. comes down to people's fear. worried about the market. the market is volatile and it's risky. what do you do when people tell you that? >> it's the thing about fear and ignorance allowing us to dictate financial decisions. we should never allow that. we should never be scared of something you don't know about. a lot of individuals are scared of something because they have not put pun in the market. what other alternatives do you have? show me another that can give you a 13.2% return. you show me another that can give that type of return or security. what we have to do, this is what lewis has been doing for years, directly addressing and making sure you know there are other alternatives such as exchange traded funds. for $150 a share you can buy the entire s&p 500. >> all you need is a trading account to get in. this gives you exposure. >> again, you don't trust because it's high risk. there's ways to mitiga
. some join right out of high school with the promise that they can further their education while in the military. this helps not only our troops but an educated military helps america. now the administration has broken another promise. thousands of troops can no longer go to college because the education program has been scuttled. for the sake of politics, the chicken little administration has handpicked programs to cut that would make americans feel the sequester the most. one of those programs is the military tuition assistance program. mr. speaker, tuition assistance for our military is not much money. the pentagon, the department of defense, has a budget of $700 billion. this little program is .1% of e $700 billion department of defense program. the tuition assistance program is great because it's one of the ways our government can take care of our men and women who help us. it's allowed members of the military to take 870,000 courses and graduate 50,000 individuals from many degrees. that is remarkable. but the program is gone thus sayeth the white house. the over the past f
on yields. investors are racing to the safe haven of things. almost any conversation about education ends up coming down to money. money is the reason behind the latest and largest school closures in our nations history. chicago is closing 54 schools. can you imagine? it's an effort to shore up the billion dollar budget deficit. as shocking as this sounds, cities are facing similar meesures are in your city could be one of them. could this actually be the best medicine? joining me n is the ceo of the illinois policy institute. >> and the 2010 census, 200,000 africans left and that has been a decades long time. many are declaring that the chicago public school system, which has monopoly control over educational systems is failing. they are leaving. we have these empty scols that have to be closed. melissa: it seems a liitle too easy. some people have been saying that the schools are empty, they are curable schools, is they're not going to be overcrowding? >> chicago's population is in a long-term decline. we have the lowest population that we have had since 1920. it was built from hundreds of
that the economic philosophy of republicans has caused a massive amount of wealth for everyone. and education is ripe if reform and republican principles are perfect for minority voters. >> should i let you weigh in? >> i'm sorry. >> why are you laughing? >> you're laughing at education. expound upon your laughter on education. >> well, because its s's ridicus to try to think that the party who tried to get rid of the department of education is the one who wants to push education. it's ridiculous to think the tent that wanted to gut the teachers union want to push education. the party that wanted to take funding away from education is now the party in favor of education. that's reason i started laughing. >> those policieses worked well for you over the last 40 years. those schools that you're professing that teachers unions have a hold on on are doing really well. where school choice and charter schools that's what's doing well and voters across minority voters to voters of every ethnicity tick have seen the benefits of those kind of schools. >> by this argument, we can see how difficult the
, we are well trained. we do not come out there as police officers. we are into education and training. we are not looking to enforce. we tried to instill the idea that the security plan is paramount, providing the framework by which an establishment protect itself from inappropriate behavior and criminal acts for a working relationship with the community and the police. there is that umbrella of security and personnel. we looked at the management to hire the appropriate personnel. hiring, training, and supervision. everything that you need. all of our problems come from the over service of alcohol. we ask for owners to train for over service. we also look for physical security measures, like scanning. additional parking and security of the exterior is important. we think that an ongoing plan management -- constantly as cds nightclub owners assessing management. it is readjusted when necessary. the bottom line is they have a great security plan and they will limit their liability. it is all about making money and defending yourself against liability. that is what we try to preach to cl
the pentagon, half from nondefense programs. everything from education to national parks to meals on wheels. $1.2 trillion in cuts over ten years. >> stephen: yeah, but it won't be that bad because there's no way america is going to last ten years. we have two tops. [laughter] obama is trying to scare us into responsible behavior. >> thousands of teachers and educators will be laid off. air traffic controllers and airport security will see cutbacks which means more delays at airports across the country. emergency responders, their ability to help communities respond to and recover from disasters will be degraded. federal prosecutors have to close cases and let criminals go. >> stephen: don't believe him nation, obama is trying to convince us the sequester is a terrible problem when in fact it's a terrible solution. it was born back in 2011 when obama wanted to raise the debt ceiling. the amount that america can borrow to pay its bills. it's sort of like raising the credit limit on your visa to pay off your mastercard if you had used your mastercard to pay for two trillion-dollar wars. but -- li
to the senate floor. gregg? >> growing concerns over higher education in the united states as new numbers suggest the level of student loan debt is reaching crisis proportions. according to the federal reserve bank of new york, americans now hold a total of nearly a trillion dollars in student loan debt, as an average of $23,000 per person and that could take an advantage person roughly tn years to pay off, maybe more. joining us now the reverend jesse jackson, founder and president of the rainbow push coalition. i know you're deeply concerned about this, in part because i read your recent column on the problem. how do we solve it. >> well, it's more about a trillion dollars, more than credit card debt, so many youth who have able minds will not apply and those in school cannot stay in. and in black colleges about 15,000 fewer this year and some, the money without necessarily the grade. and some grades can't because of the money and that undermines our future capacity to compete. >> gregg: part of the problem is that the price of a four-year college education has really skyrocketed. i loo
to thank my colleagues in the education department in the fine arts museum of san francisco for an allowing me to speak today. valuable artwork -- rene, director of public programs and last on this list but certainly not least gregory stock who is a programming wizard. i'm so grateful for their individual and collective support. i would also like to thank the production manager who is behind-the-scenes somewhere. he's waving. our production manager consistently provide patient and reliable technical support which is beyond value when lecturing to large audiences like those of you gathered today. without further a do, i'm honored to share with you today paintings that comprise the exhibition here at the museum. girl with a pearl earring, from january 26-june 2nd the museum will be the first venue in the american tour of paintings from the royal picture gallery which is located in haik. how many have individual painting in the normal home? a good number of you. this unique museum is often called the jouleewelry box. it has the world's most prestigious paintings from the morris house which to
of education creating and filling a new job and pays six figures. and washington correspondent byron york joins us and the reason is, this is probably after the sequestration. >> it is, it's the white house initiative on educational excellence for african-americans, it was created by executive order. >> greta: the president did it. >> he created it himself, by the president last year. it was placed in the education department, pay is about $124,000 a year and it's just been filled. >> greta: after march 1st? >> after march 1st and sequestration takes effect. what you have when you have the czars or coordinators or whatever you want to call them, it's an admission that the federal government has a lot of programs that are spending a lot of money that aren't well-coordinated and aren't working together well and the president feels he needs to appoint somebody to do that. right there it's kind of an admission the whole system is a little bloated. >> greta: after everything else is cut march 1st and when he created by executive order we knew sequestration was likely to happen within six or seven mo
, or the end of men. more women than men get a college education, women are for the first time in the majority in the workplace, in managerial positions. so it's very hard for us to look back to that other time. and i was, you know, even though abstractly understand that things were different, we don't know, um, we we can't really see and feel it exactly. i interviewed janet malcolm for the paris review, and she told me that when she was in college, she had not a single woman professor. and i was just shocked. even though i know that life was like that, it was kind of astonishing to me. so my first question i was going to ask our two panelists who were alive for the feminine mystique to just describe for a moment one, um, your experience when you first read the book, and it is overblown or exaggerated to say that this book changed people's lives? >> oh, i don't think there's any question. i mean, of course, it changed people's lives. it's till changing people's lives. it is passed down true the culture. and it was the greatest social revolution probably since the suffragists. and that movement
, elected officials, educators, law enforcement officials and leaders from the private and public sector, all of whom have traveled here from washington, dc from sacramento and all over the bay area. so thank you for being here today. we are grateful for an opportunity to come together with you to create schools and communities where young people are healthy and safe and feel welcome and they are allowed to learn and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying and to measure our progress. it's a promise we want to join you in keeping to our children and our youth in california. some of you know that we started this summit yesterday with a screening of the documentary film, bully, to 3,000 students in san francisco from san francisco's public schools. the superintendent of schools you're going to hear from in a minute, he was there, i know ter theresa sparks was there, i was so
-- lgbt community. the benefits and what is in play. outreach education and enrollment. you have to inform them of their choices and provide ways to help enroll new coverage where it is available. scaling of the workforce is how we can help with this. how will the care be monitored, and medicaid expansion decisions, health insurance exchanges and ultimately the future of ryan white. i will wrap up now and review of some of these thoughts with what the panel has to say. thank you. [applause] >> thank you, for that thoughtful overview. we are going to move now to our panel discussion. our moderator this morning is the advisor for lgbt policy and racial justice and director of the fire initiative that explores the impact of public policy on gay and transgender people of color. >> good morning, everyone. thank you for providing a great overview for us on how this benefits lgbt people and people living with hiv. includes the principles of universal design. some are marginalized among us and we are helping to work to get a system that works for everyone. we are we're going to talk about what we
she's tried to influence the education policy and i enjoy talking with her and even more so the older sister who had gone to india to become involved with children who would not have had an education and all the issues related to that. i thought this was interesting and worst doing so i decided the best option was to offer myself to become a nun so at the age of 17 i spoke to the reverend mother to say i decided to become a nun. she said think about it. go away for a year then be will receive you. my parents were very happy with my choice because i honored to be a nun and they're happy to have me another year. they decided nothing was too good for their daughter said they thought they would send me to paris for one year. [laughter] that changed everything. [laughter] i describe that in detail in the book. [laughter] and they came under a different influence. i had a grandfather retired earlier and what he practiced with the pork guy against the landlord and he was pleased to have a young girl who was interested in what he was talking about. he did not know how to speak to a child and
. the story from our chief education correspondent rehema ellis. >> we want to go straight. >> reporter: this may look like an outing for a boating club, but it's a public school gym class. >> keep going! >> you have to use your arms and it also helps you move your legs, too. >> you live longer, stay healthy. >> everything's fun. >> reporter: in miami dade county where 14% of middle school students are obese, there is a new approach to physical education. catering to kids' interests. >> i like the bikes. that's my favorite. >> reporter: to get them up, moving and healthy. >> we are seeing kids over weight losing an average of eight pounds a semester. kids with eating disorders are putting on an average of two pounds a semester. >> reporter: despite strained finances for gym programs, no money turned out to be no problem. why? nearly a decade ago the school district's phys ed director enlisted the help of parents, the principal and superintendents and began raising money. >> we have been able to secure outside grant money, community resources. >> reporter: a school without a gym turned a
health professionals to parents and educators, in an effort named at preventing more tragedies like this. >> jon: the president there reacting to the tragedy at sandy hook elementary school. one key item in his plan, the ban on assault weapons. that ended this week after harry reid dropped the ban from any legislation. so, jim, you didn't get a lot of coverage on that in the media. >> well, on cnn on thursday, you got a certain amount of oh, hand wringing, it's so terrible. the end of everything in terms of this issue. and you're struck by the contrast that news thursday was covered and the flip for the president in last year. talks about mental health parents, educators and the pl panoply of things you might do. and so adam lanza the killer there, and sort of fallen out of the picture and the things have become gone control. the at media is so focused, john holmes, right about a the lot of things, converted to islam, and in terms of what was going on with him. the only thing they want, define as justice for newtown is gun control up or down. >> jon: we'll get to you in a second, judy. r
that address matters of elementary and secondary education, a formative action in higher education, and equal educational opportunity. he is also the reason why sarah was able to say such nice tings about me because he was my supervisor when i was there and taught me everything that i know. he will discuss issues of racial equality, growing rights and speeches in "the year of the turtle." our second speaker is peter nicholas. he is a officer of lot the. -- at the university of washington school of law. prior to pursuing in the law, professor nicholas was a research economist at the university of michigan and served as a member of the ann arbor city council. he will discuss the speeches and the current battles over gay rights, same-sex marriage, the gay minority and the gay minority in the leaders of the african american community. we have the professor of law at armored law school. before her ointment, she was a tenured professor at the university of pennsylvania law school. and she worked in the civil rights commission at the united states department of justice and headed the voting rights p
made possible by the u.s. department of education captioned by the caption center wgbh educational foundation >>> next on "abc 7 news" at 9:00. city of san francisco quick response to an overnight club shooting. also the dramatic 911 call after a mother says two teens shot her toddler. a man falsely convict of a crime [ wind howling ] [ female announcer ] it balances you... [ water crashing ] fills you with energy... and it gives you what you are looking for to live a more natural life. in a convenient two bar pack. this is nature valley... delicious granola bars made with the best ingredients in nature. nature valley. nature at its most delicious. >>> inside the 330 rich nightclub the shooting started early this morning and up to the street to the brannon street parking lot. first shot was fired at 1:15. for her safety she did not want to go on camera. >> they were fighting and shooting and running. we sat down by somebody's humer. >> the shooting went on for a while. >> for about 15 minutes. 15 minutes long, nonstop. consistently shooting. >> first tire was flattened by a b
. for me, right now, the most important thing is about educating and locking arms with people so they don't say, what can i do? theyt people to know what can do and feel empowered and realize how much power they do have to say something. to speak up for somebody. and hopefully, with -- what the symbol is, i think the breast cancer analogy is so beautiful to me. when i see, breast cancer used to be a thing -- don't talk about that. now, you see people wearing the pink ribbon, and i always feel like -- rockstar. they are so proud. you see somebody that survived rest cancer and you want to jump on the bandwagon and support. you look at them differently and admire them and they are so empowered. whether it is breast cancer, are all the different things, once you have survived it, you are empowered. these's unify around issues and make it something so we stopped blaming other people and taking responsibility. this morning listening to vice president biden, he said if a woman runs across the field naked, you can arrest her for indecent exposure. but that does that give you the right to rape her
billion in one year. we spend about $100 billion on education. we spend about $40 billion-plus, a little over, on highways, roads and bridges. that's just an example. we are now surging from 200, 250 in interest to 800 in interest as a result of the accounting that c.b.o. has provided us if we follow this path. it's going to crowd out spending for research. it's going to crowd out spending for children, education, health care and any other program this government wishes to undertake, including defense. mr. president, what kind of time limit might i inquire? is it 30 minutes on this side on this motion? the presiding officer: on the motion, there is one hour equally divided. would the senator like to call up his motion? mr. sessions: my first question would be how much time is left on my half of that hour? the presiding officer: the motion has not yet been called. mr. sessions: well, i would call up the motion, mr. president. the presiding officer: the clerk will report the motion. the clerk: the senator from alabama, mr. sessions, moves to recommit senate concurrent resolution 8 back to
and to get an education and get a good job, to worship got in their own way, to get married, to raise a family. the same is true of those young palestinians i met with this morning. the same is true for young palestinians who yearn for a better life in gaza. that's where peace begins. not just in the plans of leaders but in the hearts of people. not just in some carefully designed process, but in the daily connections, that sense of empathy that takes place among those who live together in this land and in this sacred city of jerusalem. and let me say this as a politician. i can promise you this. political leaders will never take risks if the people do not push them to take some risks. you must create the change that you want to see. ordinary people can accomplish extraordinary things. i know this is possible. look to the bridges being built in business in civil society by some of you here today. look at the young people who have not yet learned a reason to mistrust or those young people who have learned to overcome a legacy of mistrust that they inherited from their parents. because
with our financial ostentations to educate consumers about the new value proposition that this will bring. though idea is to make shopping easier. fully convergent, both for remote transactions and processing transactions. tracy: what does this mean in the terms that we may buy a loaf of bread at the grocery store. >> our vision is that with your phone you will be doing a tap and pay at a physical location and when you will want to make a payment over your phone you well not have to enter your 16 digit number but you simply have to enter a log and password. tracy: what about security? that is a number one concern for consumers. the mastercard brand, do you think, give you an advantage or a level of assurance that some of these other companies cannot provide. >> very much so. as a consumer you have all the benefits the you enjoy today. and we're going to introduce a security features in this digital devices. tracy: and the last thing, some of your competitors, visa and discover have recently said they will not charge any sort of fee on digital wallets, companies like paypall and even ebay
to see better educated, but you understand that an effective member has to negotiate and has to compromise to come to some sort of final product. otherwise you will never get a final product. >> i agree with -- what is the biggest problem we face today that we are just stop gone? it is this fiscal crisis, the budget. families are looking at it and saying i have got to deal with this all the time, and you guys cannot deal with it. the biggest thing to me would be the leadership of congress to recognize that the budget aocess has to be utilized in way that gets this issue resolved, because if we go every three months with more in decision and 11th-hour -- making, thetizen frustration that people have to live their lives and cannot figure out the process, it will drive them nuts and treat the most negative phillies in the world. it is the responsibility of leadership to make this process work, and they have to act like leaders, like tom daschle did and some of the other folks. >> changing the rules might take the incentive structure, but ultimately is about the men and women who
. they have an effort to balance their budget and they are cutting aid to higher education. sometimes up to 75% cuts in one year. 75% of students attend public universities. that is where this is happening. what the government is attempting to do is slightly decreased the amount of money they are making off of these students, going from 16% to 11% in fees. they do want to ensure that students are paying back something every month. so that we are preventing the cycle of default which benefits everybody in this process. allowing students were not able to get a job. really predatory loans, interest rates that are higher, refinancing to pay off over time. >> i think one of the biggest problem is that we need to increase the qualifications for loans. we need to make it more academics we see students getting into the university system. not everyone benefits from a college education. neil: high school seniors, for example, breaking out. >> is if they are able to thrive in a college environment and their background. we have to make sure that we're putting those students through college. we don't want
subsidy? the democratic plan invests in infrastructure, education, job training and innovation. it is designed first and foremost to help create jobs and strengthen the economy. the house democratic budget also makes critical investments in our future. $200 billion is invested in infrastructure, education, job training and innovation. helping to create jobs and strengthen the economy. these investments include $80 billion for an education jobs initiative, $50 billion for transportation needs and $10 billion for infrastructure -- for an infrastructure jobback -- bank. as federal reserve chairman ben bernanke has said many times over the past few years, simply pursuing deep cuts in the short-term will slow the rate of economic growth and bring down revenues and lead to less deficit reduction. we have two paths before us. we can choose a path of austerity and indifference that will limit economic growth and increase inequality or we can choose one of inspiration and inclusion that invests in our country and creates opportunities for everyone. i choose opportunity over austerity an
confident that an investment in their education will lead them to good-paying jobs when they graduate. a balanced budget gives them that confidence that their future will not be threatened by staggering debt. most important we must balance our budget for our children and grandchildren who deserve the same chance of the american dream that we have been given. rather than handing them a bill for this generation's irresponsibility, a balanced budget will allow us to hand them a brighter future, an american future. our budget, a balanced budget, represents a departure from the status quo here in washington and it represents house republicans' commitment to moving our nation forward in a fiscally responsible way. i urge my colleagues to support this resolution and i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from maryland, mr. sarbanes, for five minutes. mr. sarbanes: mr. speaker, i rise today to commemorate the 192nd anniversary of greek independence day. greece and america are history's most storied democracies. our founding
education, because i feel that if we educate ourselves, the more we educate ourselves, that we can overcome poverty. and the fact that if we do it as a community, and we stick together, we bond together, we support one another, with education, with health, then we can start to fix some of the issues at the root of the cause. and so we can erase, we can erase families who are struggling to get by on minimum wage. we can erase the drug abuse that we see on the streets and in the home. we can erase the gun violence and the domestic violence, and we can start to bring attention to mental illness. but this can only be done if everyone in the community is invested. so i think it has to be a position that we all take in which we say, yeah, take better care of yourself, yeah, go for your prescreening to make sure that you don't have any ailment that can be detrimental to you down the road. we also can then turn to our youth and our adults and say, "it's okay to get educated on these matters, it's okay to do well in school, for the young person that's in school. it's okay to achieve and be academica
. and partly because having grown up in new york city as i will tell you with a very inadequate education he was not capable of writing a thank you note. so if his wife was unable to do for him and she would almost everything, if she couldn't do for him he didn't do it because his spelling was phonetic german accent spelling. his handwriting can only be described as horrible. so people often want to know how i came to write about thomas nast and it's a story that originated in gretchen school in california, where i was contributing material for an encyclopedia and produced by my visor, and i chose his name off of a list thinking it would be entertaining. and then my what to look for me to about him i couldn't find any and i thought i'm the world's worst graduate student and they should take me out. i called by pfizer and said i don't know what i'm doing. she said let me look. she looked and she said it's fine, it's not you. there is nothing about him. so it turns out that what existed at that time was a biography published in 1904 by albert bigelow paine who is a newspaper writer for childre
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